Archive for the ‘ screenwriting books ’ Category

Best Selling Romance Books

Article by Roberto Sedycias

Romantic novelists are amongst the most famous of authors. Many ardent fans await a new novel from their favorite writer with great anticipation. One author noted for her realism is E.V. Mitchell, and The color of Heaven certainly doesn’t disappoint. The central character is Sophie, a columnist whose charmed life falls apart after she finds out her husband is having an affair and her daughter suffers a serious illness. When she is at her lowest and feels like nothing else can go wrong, her cars skids off an icy road and into a frozen pond, thus taking Sophie on a profound and heart wrenching journey. The character is believable and likable we live every moment of her journey with her. A highly enjoyable read which will tug at your emotions in all the right places.

A gritty, action packed romance full of twists and turns is the synopsis of Livewire the latest release from Lora Leigh. We are plunged straight into the world of intrigue with the male lead, Capt Jordan Malone. A maverick who leads an elite team to fight terror. The man is an enigma and even his his loyal team don’t know his true identity. Enter Tehya Talamosi, AKA Enigma, a female counterpart who, with a mind full of secrets and a body to die for, sets about to bring Malone to his knees. They embark on their most dangerous, and personal mission and the reader is dragged along for the ride. Dark, intriguing and fast paced, this is a modern day romance that will leave you satisfied but exhausted.

Her last letter is a suspenseful novel from the pen of Nancy C. Johnson. Set in the Colorado mountain town of Glenwood Springs, photographer and author Gwyn Sanders discovers an old, cryptic letter which had been written by Kelly, her deceased sister. The letter reveals that she was in a sexual relationship with her sisters boyfriend and feared for her life, this is particularly shocking as Kelly was a hit and run victim. As both Gwyn and her other sister Linda are both married, either of their husbands could be the man in question. As the sisters received a large inheritance before they met their future husbands and, upon discussion, realize they know little of their backgrounds, they have to face up to the fact that one of their much loved partners could be a murderer. Bring a private detective into the mix and you have the ingredients for a solid and fascinating ride as the story unfolds.

Robyn Carr’s vivid descriptions bring the back drop of Virgin River to life in the heartwarming Harvest Moon. Kelly Matlock is a successful chef in San Francisco before she collapses at work. She is burnt out and retreats to her sister house in Virgin River to re-evaluate her life. After a while she begins to feel agitated and unhappy with the peace and quiet, until she meets the handsome Lief Holbrook. A screenwriter with the looks of a rugged lumberjack, Kelly finds him irresistible. The only fly in the ointment is Courtney, his troublesome teenage daughter who can find trouble anywhere,even in Virgin River. Can she overcome this baggage to find happiness? You’ll enjoy finding out.

When Blake, a glamorous ex model, finds out that her live in boyfriend is up to his neck in trouble with the underworld and a handsome special forces veteran, Caleb, is hired to secretly protect her, you know sparks are going to fly. Her secret bodyguard by Misha Crew is an enjoyable romp as Caleb discovers there is a lot more to Blake than the stereotypical dumb model. Danger and intrigue are also thrown into the mix and you end up really caring about this couple and whether they can survive their feeling for each other, if at all.

You can have access to articles in Portuguese language from page http://www.polomercantil.com.br/livros.php

Roberto Sedycias works as an IT consultant for http://www.polomercantil.com.br/










Screenwriting Tips

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Technorati
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace

Article by Dirk Wittenborn

I was born because a man came to kill my father. If he hadn’t showed up with a gun in his pocket and bad thoughts in his head, I wouldn’t exist, much less have a story to tell. This tragic footnote to my conception left me feeling as if I had three parents: a father, a mother, and a murderer.

My father suffered from strange and temporarily paralyzing attacks of catatonia that my family, with characteristic discretion, referred to as Dad’s “Sock Moments.” You would walk past my parents’ bedroom door on the way to breakfast or the bathroom and glimpse Dad sitting on his side of the bed, fully dressed, legs crossed, one shoe on, sock in hand, about to put on his other shoe. Perfectly normal, right? Trouble was, sometimes ten or twenty minutes would pass and you’d look in on him again and he’d still be sitting there, sock in hand, staring at the other shoe he’d yet to fill.

Once, my sister Lucy and I clocked him with the timer my mother used to make sure the roast beef was rare. Fifty-seven minutes passed before he got the other sock on. Frozen in time and space in his own thoughts, Dad would appear perfectly normal, except for the look he’d have in his eye. It wasn’t a faraway, glassy-eyed stare, it was a perplexed squint, as if he were trying to see something he wasn’t sure was there.

My father could have three episodes in a week, then there’d be a six month reprieve. Usually, but not always, these becalmed fits of melancholic introspection would come over him in the morning as he readied himself to set off for work. But sometimes, they’d ambush him in the evening, when he went upstairs just for a moment to put on a fresh shirt or wash his hands or bring my mother her purse. Occasionally, according to my mom, they’d even bushwhack him after midnight, when a dry mouth or a bad dream would wake him and he’d reach for his slippers with the thought of heading downstairs to make himself a cup of tea or a stiff drink. Only he’d never get there. Technically, those weren’t sock moments because my mother would wake up and find her husband cradling a slipper. But the question remained the same: what was going on in Dad’s head?

Once, when I was eight, and Dad was lost in his bedroom with nothing but a sock to show him the way home, I snuck into the room, tiptoed past him, and slipped into his big closet. He used it as a dressing room. It was the grandest thing about the house we lived in then; it was a long, narrow, wondrous little right-triangle of a room tucked under the stairs to the attic. It had a round window at one end that offered a view of nothing but sky and it smelled of cedar and shoe polish and dust from parts of his life that were none of a small boy’s business.

I knew I was trespassing. The closet was Dad’s private space, to be entered only at his personal invitation, and explored under his supervision. There were bone-handled pocket knives to be opened and closed, flyrods to be assembled, and a wooden crate that once held a dozen bottles of Chateau Y’quem but now was home to the collection of Indian arrowheads and stone tomahawks he’d found in freshly plowed fields and unearthed in serpentine burial mounds during what passed for boyhood in his hardscrabble, Midwestern youth. But his hospitality had its limits. Even when I was a baby, if I crawled too far back into his closet and tried to open the old steamer-trunk, latched, strapped closed, and too heavy to lift, visiting hour would be over. My father would pull me away from it as if it were radioactive and in the grownup voice he used with doctors who came to our house to talk to him, he’d announce, “Nothing in there pertains to you.”

I remember asking him once, “Then why can’t I look in it?”

“I’ve lost the key,” was what he said, but I didn’t believe it. I just figured that’s where Dad kept his real treasure and he didn’t want anyone to know because he was afraid they’d steal it.

Back when I was invading Dad’s private space at age eight I felt guilty on two counts; I was doing what I had been told not to do and worse, I was taking unfair advantage of what seemed to be, until several decades later, my father’s only weakness — his sock moments. Whether out of my own innate sense of fairness or fear of the great man, paralyzed on the edge of the bed, I did not go directly to the trunk that loomed so large in my imagination. Instead, I contented myself with taking out the Indian artifacts. A noisy child by nature, prone to talking to myself out loud, I retold the stories he had shared with me about the Indian tribes that lorded over the state of Illinois long before he was born — the Kaskaskia, the Cahokia, and the Peoria tribes, decimated by their brethren, the Iroquois, in the Beaver Wars. But it wasn’t the same. I wanted his voice, I wanted him to come back from wherever he was in his Sock Moment, I wanted him to hear me. Anything was preferable to the loneliness I felt knowing he could be so close and yet still so far away.

Suddenly desperate to break the spell that held him, I did the worst thing I could imagine, far more forbidden and dangerous and unforgivable than opening the trunk — I stood up on the overturned wine box, pulled out the squeaky top drawer of his head-high dresser, and took hold of the loaded.38 caliber long-barreled Smith & Wesson revolver he kept on top of his clean handkerchiefs.

He was so far gone even the sound of me opening the forbidden gun drawer did not wake him. Not even the click of me closing the cylinder snapped him out of whatever held him captive. What if Dad never woke up? What if he never came back from the Sock Moment? What if he stayed petrified like that forever?

Missing him, wanting him, needing him, and mad at him, I pulled back the hammer of the big pistol. My hands shook, my finger closed on the trigger. If I fired the gun, he’d have to wake up. No matter how severely I’d be punished, at least he’d be with me. An eighth of an ounce of trigger pressure away from bringing the hammer down on the moment — the thought occurred to me: what if I pulled the trigger and he still didn’t wake up?

Then I’d know there was no hope. I lowered the hammer and placed the handgun back onto tomorrow’s handkerchief and closed the squeaky drawer.

I went back out into his bedroom and got down on my knees the way you do in church. Taking the argyle sock from his hand, I gently began to pull it onto his long, narrow, white foot.

I watched as my father’s eyes focused down on me. They were grey, pearly and wet, like the inside of a shell pulled up from the sea with something alive inside it.

“Daddy?” He had a scar shaped like a crescent on his forehead. His hair was grey and cut so short you could see the shape of his skull and the veins feeding his brain like the Visible Man model he had helped me put together.

“Yes?” He still sounded far away.

“What are you thinking?”

“I was thinking about… ” The sock was on now. He was lacing up the shoe by himself. “… how I feel about things.”

No question, my mother would have sent him to a good psychologist if Dad wasn’t already a shrink himself, a semi-famous shrink, in fact, Dr. William T. Friedrich. I failed Psych 1A myself, but I’m told if you made it to the second semester, your professor probably mentioned his name. He was what they used to call a neuropsychopharmacologist. If there’s brain candy in your medicine cabinet, chances are my father’s messed with your head, too.

Reprinted by arrangement with Viking, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., from Pharmakon by Dirk Wittenborn. Copyright © 2008 by Dirk Wittenborn.

Author BioDirk Wittenborn is a novelist and screenwriter whose two previous novels, Zoe and Fierce People, have been published in more than a dozen countries. Fierce People was released as a feature film in 2007. He is the Emmy-nominated producer of the HBO documentary Born Rich and the cowriter and coproducer of The Lucky Ones, a feature film about American soldiers returning from Iraq. He lives in New York City. His latest book, Pharmakon, is available this July from Viking.

Screenwriting Tips

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Technorati
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace

Article by Joe Keny

Incitement incident is the first major incident in the narrative. It is the cause of everything that follows, and if you want your readers to continue reading, it is essential that you start with one extraordinary event.

The documentary bestseller Blink by Malcolm Gladwell s ‘opens with the Conservatives at the J. Paul Getty Museum in the scam for $ 10 million while the purchase of a sixteenth century BC sculpture, known as kouros. The Tin Roof purge a novel by James Lee Burke, opens with a priest standing on a roof of a hut in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans, trying to save people trapped in the attic, like any the force of Hurricane Katrina to door on him. Both books begin with a dramatic opening, or what screenwriters call the incident incentives. Inciting incident is the first major incident in the narrative. It is the cause of everything that follows, and if you want your readers to continue reading, it is essential that you start with one extraordinary event. In general, an event that happens in your character or is caused by the protagonist. I am not talking about contrived scenes of action or overexagerated promises. I am referring to the beginning of your book with a story, a story or an event that upsets the balance of forces within your story.

In the Blink of an EyeMalcolm Gladwell’s subtitle is Blink to The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. By opening with $ 10 million art scam, rather than to explain exactly what he means by thinking without thinking, we follow the story of Federico Zeri, an art historian and board member of Getty administration. Zeri departure is the statue of the nails. Even if a dozen experts has signed on the kouros-geologists took core samples of the statue and marble analyzed under an electron microscope, electron microbe, mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, Etc. according Zeri, something is not right Look. Then we meet Evelyn Harrison, an expert on Greek sculpture, who knew the statue was a fake when she saw it. In a sense, Blink is about why our intuitions usually turn to be true. Malcolm Gladwell might be the master of spectacle do not say. It does not begin his book by telling us how it is brilliant. There can wow us with facts. It does not seek to convince us he is right. What it does is to tell a story. A story of great power deceived people with experts fellows, and museum curators blinded by the glory and harebrained lawyers. In other words, it tells a story, we can not make.

Excite Me, Do It and FastWe’ve expect an excellent opening of mystery and suspense novels like James Lee Burke’s Tin Roof purge. Burke begins by putting us right in the middle of Hurricane Katrina. A storm, described Burke as “… with more impact than the bomb that hit Hiroshima and peeled off the south side of Louisiana. “Only after we were drawn into the book that focuses more on its characters “Inner life that the devastation around you write them.Whether documentary or fiction, it is important for you to create an incident that throws your characters in a balanced manner that raises your readers and your characters The desire to restore this balance. This done, and you just have your readers when you want. Play.

This article is written by Free Article Tool.

Joe Keny – Everthing about business.The above article can be found in Business Center.










Screenwriting Tips

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Technorati
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace

Article by Sandra Schrift

Publishing Guidelines: You are welcome to publish this article in its entirety, electronically, or in print freeof charge, as long as you include my full signature file for ezines, and my Web site address(http://www.schrift.com)in hyperlink for other sites. Please send a courtesy link or email where you publish to sandra@schrift.com. Thank you.

___________________________________________________________

TITLE: How to Create Sizzling Speech and Book Titles AUTHOR: Sandra SchriftCONTACT: sandra@schrift.comCOPYRIGHT:

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Technorati
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace

Article by Free Internet Films 1945

GoArticles reader,Given for your enjoyment, a collection of takes on the breathtaking new “The Book of Eli” film…As post-apocalyptic movie fiction goes, “The Book of Eli” is not a crowd-pleaser like the “Mad Max” cycle nor mad like any of the “Planet of the Apes” films. This film, the to begin with from the Hughes Brothers in nearly nine years, instead is an intense, surprisingly honest study of a man making his way through a wilderness of catastrophic destruction and soul cruelty like a latter-day prophet. The story is couched in neo-Western conditions — a isolated gunman comes to a urban and confronts the dishonest sheriff and his maniacal deputies — so the film fits comfortably inside the confines of mainstream studio moviemaking. And Denzel Washington is solitary of the few Hollywood stars who can pull off a bigger -than-life character who can assassinate a gang of cutthroats with a horrible blade yet keep up an air of saintliness.Boxoffice should be above average for this Warner Bros. Don’t be shocked if the film is embraced by Christian filmgoers as the Holy Bible is seen as the place from which a new civilization can take shape.Allen and Albert Hughes situate their story in an atmosphere informed by realistic -novel metaphors. Landscapes are desolate, and characters hit poses. effective with cinematographer Don Burgess, they commonly drain the color from isolated stretches of desert (with New Mexico doing the honors). As in “Mad Max,” anarchy rules, with havoc, murder and rape seen as practice events. Washington’s Eli claims to have walked west for 30 days, but everything looks like the bomb dropped only last month. After a “diploma scene,” in which Eli demonstrates his lethal abilities when challenged, he wanders into a desert town where a tin-pot dictator named Carnegie (Gary Oldman by way of his patented theatrical sleaze) holds sway. There is no evident reason why he should rule a gang unless it’s because he’s the exclusion to the rule of near-universal illiteracy. When Carnegie learns that Eli possesses a Bible, he agency to win him over to his cause or kill him — whatever it takes to gain control of that book. Both men see the Bible as the key to community regeneration. Caught in the fight between two firm men are Carnegie’s adopted daughter, Solara (Mila Kunis), and mistress Claudia (Jennifer Beals) as perfectly as his henchman, Redridge (Ray Stevenson), who fancies Solara for himself. stuff play out in a straight-forward transform as screenwriter Gary Whitta gives little depth or complications to his characters or story. A viewer will possibly be grabbed less by the showdowns than by the elaborate cinematography, Gae Buckley’s eye-catching manufacture design of a ruined Southwest and an energetic, pulsating score from Atticus Ross (assisted by Claudia Sarne and Leopold Ross). What is it re Earth’s ruin that so inspires artists? I’m at a damage for words, so let me say these right away: “The Book of Eli” is very watchable. You won’t be forlorn you went. “How do you know you’re walking the right way?” he’s asked. After a calamity has wiped out most of the Earth’s population and left ruin and desolation behind, the remaining humans are victimized by roaming motorcycle gangs of hijackers and thieves. This wasteland Eli treks at an ruthless pace. Set upon in an ambush, he kills all his attackers. Washington and the Hughes brothers do a good job of establishing this man and his globe, and at first, “The Book of Eli” seems destined to be serious. But then Eli arrives at a Western town ruled by Carnegie (Gary Oldman), who, like all the citizen overloads in Westerns and gangster movies, sits in the wake of a big desk flanked by a tall bald guy and, of course, a short scruffy one. How are these guys recruited? Wanted: Tall bald guy to get up behind town boss and be willing to sacrifice life. All the water you can drink.We join Carnegie’s abused wife Claudia (Jennifer Beals) and her daughter Solara (Mila Kunis), named, for several reason, after the bring about of all the destruction. She’s a prostitute in Carnegie’s bar, having made the lapse of coming in on Take Your Child to Work Day. Carnegie hurts Claudia to check Solara. How he controls the terrifying bald guy is hard to say.So many other movies are referenced that we very nearly miss it when their hideout house is perforated by bullets in “L.A. That allows countless beams of sunlight to shine in and function as a metaphor.The Hughes brothers have a vivid way with metaphors here, as in their earlier films such as “Menace II Society” and the underrated “From Hell.” The film looks and feels good, and Washington’s piece is the more mysterious the more we think back over it. The fourth film from directors Allen and Albert Hughes, The Book of Eli centers on the Christianity that was at the margins of their previous films-hypocritically misused by Bokeem Woodbine’s bush-crazy marine turned pulpit-pounder turned stick-up man in Dead Presidents, and the sanctimonious grandparents in Menace II Society.”I don’t think God really cares too to a great extent about us, or he wouldn’t have put us here. In The Book of Eli, the whole world’s a blasted ghetto. As in The Road, The End has terminally desaturated the world’s palette. On the road since Year Zero, Denzel Washington’s Eli has become an expert at using his brutally quick axe arm to ward off nomadic bands of highwaymen from his precious consignment : the last copy of the Bible.The other copies have been destroyed as taboo, since pious conflict inspired the nuclear holocaust. That’s not impossible to believe, though it taxes na?vet? that a fragmented society that can’t dig freshwater wells has managed to do away with every other copy of the most everywhere book in the Western world, undoing all of the Gideons’ superior work. As does the adherent Eli attracting Solara-a badly miscast Mila Kunis, who looks like she’s spending a semester abroad in the post-Judgment Day from her vogue school’s co-op program. It’s water and a battery allege that lure Eli down the Main Street of a repopulated ghost town. Carnegie is one of the few survivors, like Eli, old enough to recall the lost world. It’s with cynical messianic intent that he’s been scouring the countryside for a Good Book, which sets up a fight with true believer Eli.The Hugheses once had a black-comic sense to bout their comic-book horror impulses (every line of Menace is a potential inside joke). Here, that feeling is evident only in a hard shoulder stop-off with some unhinged survivalists, an elderly American Gothic couple played by Michael Gambon and Frances de la Tour. Nobody reads Pilgrim’s Progress any longer, so I guess you take it where you can get it, but The Book of Eli’s plastic parable isn’t much more complex than Insane Clown Posse theology. Eli himself resoundingly fails to tag on the Good Samaritan’s pattern when witnessing a roadside hijacking; the most that can be said is that he leftovers chaste without visible effort. Our hero is mostly an Old Testament smiter of the wicked, conclusively -but for I forget when Christ said, “You lay that hand on me again and you will not get it back” at the Garden of Gethsemane.And on that note, GoArticles reader, do be so kind as to visit and bookmark my blog http://the-final-film.blogspot.com, where you can watch “The Book Of Eli” free online the minute it becomes available!

Basic InformationSex: FemaleBirthday: June 2, 1985Hometown: Indianapolis, IARelationship Status: SingleWatch Movies Free Before They Get To Theaters! 1 Short Survey, Lifetime Access!http://the-final-film.blogspot.com










Screenwriting Tips

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Technorati
  • Live
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace