Archive for August, 2011


Peter & Bobby Farrelly (“Dumb & Dumber,” “There’s Something About Mary,” “Kingpin,” “The Three Stooges”) and co-writers Pete Jones & Kevin Barnett discuss why “Hall Pass” was the toughest script they’ve ever written and how they walk the fine line between offensive and hillarious.

Screenwriting Tips Store

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Product Description
The official screenplay book to the new film from Academy Award® winner Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain), starring Demetri Martin. Includes a color portfolio with production notes, historical images and movie stills.

Taking Woodstock is inspired by the true story of Elliot Tiber and his family, who inadvertently played a pivotal role in making the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival into the happening that it was.

It’s 1969, and Elliot, an interior … More >>
Taking Woodstock: The Shooting Script

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Article by Seth Peters

Filmmaking is costly, even more when you consider it as your hobby. People who are known to produce films in the olden times are considered as filthy rich. Nowadays with al the advances in technology, filmmaking has become changed. It’s easier for you to come up with your own film, even when you have less budget. This is even more emphasized with the emergence of independent filmmakers.

Filmmaking enthusiasts having limited resources now have a venue to express their craft. You can also find award-giving bodies that recognize those non-mainstream filmmakers.

A filmmaking software is one of the latest advancements that can be a great help to non-Hollywood but equally talented and skilled filmmakers. What’s even great is that this software can be accessed for free. All you need to do is to acquaint yourself with each one of them and still be able to find out which part or aspect of the filmmaking process it would fit in.The first filmmaking software you might want to get to know of being a filmmaker is the Celtx. This works just like the Final Draft software. It is a free, open-source screenwriting or pre-production tool. This would also let you mark up the script for production breakdown and others.

Cinepaint or what is formerly known as the FilmGimp is another tool. This is a paint program that was developed by and for film studios and intended for giving finishing touches to images of high resolution. This software has been used in several movies already and it has a new version called Glasgow that’s coming up.

Video Capturix 99 is another filmmaking software you can avail of. It is an easy to use video capturing program that allows you to capture simple movie footages from all types of video source, freeze, and save them as.BMP format or simply copy and paste them in clipboard for use in the future.

Adobe After Effects is also a great tool to use for creating high quality animation. You can enjoy sophisticated and expensive video-editing tasks in this software. The standard version of it can already provide you high-end 2D animations, composites, and advanced special effects meant for movies, broadcast video, multimedia presentations and even the web.

Movie Magic Scheduling is an industry standard in Hollywood for scheduling. This however comes with a strict copy protection. This is also true for the equivalent software in budget preparation which is called Movie Magic Budgeting. Now you are more familiar with some of the film production software choices that are available in the net. All you need to do is just figure out which ones you really need.

If you want to find out more about filmmaking software options, you can check them at the Filmmaking Mastery course.










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Capote: The Shooting Script


Product Description
The official screenplay book tie-in to the “one of the best films of the year”(Rolling Stone, Newsweek), starring Philip Seymour Hoffman as legendary writer Truman Capote on his six-year journey to research and write his masterpiece In Cold Blood.

Capote: The Shooting Script includes the complete screenplay for the acclaimed film, a foreword by Gerald Clarke, author of the bestselling biography Capote, exclusive Q&As with screenwriter Dan Futterman and… More >>
Capote: The Shooting Script

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Article by Jean Lester

TEN HABITS OF HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL SCREENWRITERSByDerek RydallFounder, ScriptwriterCentral.com

“Bad habits are like a comfortable bed, easy to get into, but hard to get out of,” — Unknown

“Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones,” — Benjamin Franklin

Think of this as a quick-reference for instant inspiration – whether you’re a screenwriter or script consultant:

1. DO SOMETHING PRODUCTIVE EVERY DAYWrite something every day – whether it’s your project or an assignment. If you find yourself stuck just staring at a blank screen, try staring at a great script instead — and try to figure out how it’s put together. It might inspire you to get your own writing done. The point here is to keep exercising and refining your craft, building your knowledge, and keeping the momentum – all of which will give you a competitive edge. This isn’t about becoming a workaholic. It’s about breaking through the inertia of complacency. It’s so easy to get comfortable, to settle for the status quo, to rationalize why you’re not doing what you know you need to in order to succeed. “I don’t fee like it,” is not a viable excuse anymore.

2. TAKE FREQUENT BREAKSThis may sound like a contradiction to the above habit. It’s not. In fact, without this one, you won’t be able to sustain the level of quality and productivity referred to above. Unless you’re able to take a break (whether it’s ten minute, an hour, a day, or a week) and recharge, you’ll soon be booking a room in burnout city.

3. GET ORGANIZEDA messy, disorganized office is an energy sapper if there ever was one. Not just because it takes longer to find that important document under that stack of unopened bills, but also because it literally pulls power from your psychic field. Every little ‘toleration’ you put up with burns fuel that could be put to much better use in growing your business.

4. WORK WHEN YOU WORK BESTSome of us are morning people. Others are struck with the muse at the stroke of midnight. If you don’t already know, find out what time of day you work best, and gear your most labor-intensive activities for that time period. (Of course, if you’re on a deadline, you might have to work around the clock, but that’s a different issue.) If you schedule your activities based on your energy cycles, you will find your productivity take a quantum leap. For example, I have two periods when I work the best – late morning and late afternoon. So I try to schedule the heavy-lifting (writing, analyzing) during those hours. When I first get up, I need to ease into the day’s work, so I do more preparatory work, like going over the day’s schedule, straightening up the office, e-mails. Once I’m warmed up, I crack open the script or writing file and get to work for a few hours. I break for lunch, meditation, make calls, work out, do some errands – and start my second writing period. Then it’s home for family time, dinner, and bedtime stories. But not my bedtime. Because at night, my energy cycle is perfect for opening mail, paying bills, filing, during simple research – tasks that don’t take a lot of energy. The point of this example is that if I opened my mail and paid my bills in the late morning, I would waste my most productive energy cycle (not to mention become depressed) which I couldn’t make-up very easily at night during my bill paying, mail-opening time. Make sense? It may take some time to find your perfect energy-schedule, but it’s worth the experimentation. I’m still making adjustments.

5. GIVE EVERY PROJECT 100%Treat every project like it’s the job of your dreams – and you’ll soon attract more and more of your dream jobs. Why? Because you don’t get what you want in life, you get what you are. Ghandi said we must become the change we want to see in the world. Likewise, we must become the kind of person who would get the kind of jobs we want in the world. This is another one of those universal principles I keep slipping in here. If it gives you a headache to try and make sense of it, don’t. Just give it a shot and see what happens.

6. KEEP LEARNINGTo have what others don’t, you must do what others won’t. The average person – and for that matter, the average script consultant – has a tendency to take the path of least resistance. So you must take the road less traveled. Stay open at the top. Maintain a Beginner’s Mind. Besides continued study in related and complimentary fields – read and investigate areas outside of your field – and outside of show business. Some of the most innovative ideas have come from people adapting concepts they discovered in completely unrelated fields.

7. ACT AND DRESS LIKE A PROThis is another relative rule. A stockbroker acts and dresses quite differently than a tennis pro. In the entertainment industry, an executive acts and dresses differently than an actor. Even more specific, different clients will have different expectations. In general, business casual seems to work best. You also want to have an updated resume and work samples readily available. Do your homework, show up to appointments with all the right gear to get the job done, and treat each client or prospect with the utmost respect and value.

8. HONOR YOUR WORK HOURSDuring work hours, especially in a home office, you’ll have plenty of opportunities for distraction from well-meaning friends and family members. In the most diplomatic tone you can muster, kindly inform them that you’re at work not at home. This is a real business, not a hobby. You’ll talk to them after hours, or on your break.

9. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELFFeed your mind and body with high quality nourishment — and exercise. I know this is obvious to most people — yet most people still don’t do it. Writing and consulting is hard work that requires real endurance. If you want to be a high-performance person, you need to run on high-octane fuel.

10. KNOW THYSELFThe most successful people, in this or any field, know who they are so they can be true to that. They also know their strengths – so they can play to them – and their weaknesses — so they can compensate for them.

If you’d like to take this to the next level, check out THE WRITE SYSTEM or THE SCRIPT CONSULTANT INSTITUTE at http://www.scriptwritercentral.com

We look forward to helping you achieve all of your writing and/or script consulting goals!

“As a screenwriter, Derek Rydall has sold, optioned, or been hired on assignment for over 20 film and TV projects. He has developed projects for the producer of Ghost, RKO, U/A, Miramax, Saturn (Nick Cage), and many indie producers, as well as worked as a staff writer for Fox, Disney, and Deepak Chopra. As a story consultant/script doctor, Derek has helped writers, producers, actors, and directors turn books into screenplays, secure millions in financing, make six-figure script deals, get hired to exec produce, direct, star in their movies, obtain major distribution, and win awards. And as an author, Derek’s book, I Could’ve Written a Better Movie than That!: How to Make Six Figures as a Script Consultant– Even if You’re Not a Screenwriter, is due out October by Michael Wiese Publishing. For more info, you can check out his site, http://www.scriptwritercentral.com, email derek@scriptwritercentral.com or call (661) 296-4991.”

Want to find out about boxwood tree and common boxwood? Get tips from the Boxwood Shrubs website.










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